Meet Differences

Let’s take a look at how Gastric Bypass Surgery and Gastric Sleeve compares in cost, scope, and health risks to Lap Band Surgery. Pay close attention to the safety and effectiveness of each – we are certain that the safety statistics, the advantages, and the uniqueness of the Lap Band make it the most optimal solution for patients struggling with obesity.

The gastric sleeve is often followed by a Gastric Sleeve or duodenal switch after the patient has lost a significant amount of weight. Called a “staged” approach to weight loss surgery, this makes the second procedure less risky than it would have been had it been the first and only procedure. The timing of the second surgery varies according to the degree of weight loss. It usually occurs within six to 18 months. The gastric sleeve is increasingly being performed as a stand-alone procedure, but many times it is considered the first step in a two part process.

<strong>Lap Band</strong>
Lap BandProcedure
“An adjustable and removable plastic band placed around the upper stomach dividing it into a tiny pouch above the band with the remaining stomach below.”

  • Mortality rate: 0.05%
  • Total complications: 9%
  • Major complications: 0.2%
The procedure is routine and only takes approximately 25 minutes.
The lap band is placed around the upper part of the stomach to form a ring. It is locked and secured with minimal stitching.
Yes! One of the unique features of the Lap Band is that it is reversible and adjustable – it can be removed completely, or adjusted for the desired rate of weight loss.
Patients are discharged the day after surgery and can return to work with no heavy lifting after just a few days.
Patients recover faster and are able to resume normal activities sooner than other methods of weight loss surgery.
Although the major risks are significantly less than other forms of bariatric surgery, possible risks do exist and include: band slippage, stretching of the pouch and erosion into the stomach. If any complications become serious, the band can simply be removed or replaced.
  • Standard risks associated with major surgery
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Band slippage (minor revisional surgery)
  • Band erosion (minor revisional surgery)
  • Access port problems (minor revisional surgery)
Costs: $5,500.00 – $25,000.00 (Avg. $16,125.00)
  • Promotes weight loss by restricting amount of food that can be eaten at any one time
  • No stomach stapling or cutting, or intestinal re-routing
  • Digestion system is not changed, and digestion goes on as normal
  • Adjustable
  • Reversible
  • Low malnutrition risk
  • Done laparoscopically (keyhole surgery)
<strong>Gastric Bypass</strong>
Gastric BypassProcedure
“An irreversible surgical procedure that forever changes the body’s anatomy making a portion of the stomach nonfunctioning and to reroute food intake to the small intestine.”
  • Mortality rate: 0.5 – 2%
  • Total complications: 23%
  • Major complications: 2.1%
The procedure takes approximately one to four hours to complete.
The stomach is divided into an upper small pouch and a lower larger remnant pouch by cutting and rerouting the small intestine. Surgical staples are used to keep the small intestine in place.
The procedure is a permanent change of the body’s anatomy – it CANNOT be reversed.
Patients are able leave the hospital within 4-6 days, return to work within 21 days, and resume normal activities in 5 weeks.
After the surgery, patients usually incur intense pain, swelling, and discomfort which lasts a few weeks.
Yes. Intense health risks can occur after Gastric Bypass Surgery such as internal bleeding, heart attacks, ulcers, hernias, recurring gallbladder stones, hospitalization, and even death.
  • Standard risks associated with major surgery
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Separation of stapled areas (major revisional surgery)
  • Leaks from staple lines (major revisional surgery)
  • Nutritional deficiencies
Costs: $14,000.00 – $48,000.00 (Avg $25,000.00)
  • Rapid initial weight loss
  • Minimally invasive approach is now more common
  • Slightly higher total average weight loss reported than with purely restrictive procedures
  • Cutting and stapling of stomach and bowel are required
  • More operative complications
  • Portion of digestive tract is bypassed, reducing absorption of essential nutrients
  • Medical complications due to nutritional deficiencies
  • Dumping syndrome can occur
  • Non-adjustable
  • Extremely difficult to reverse
  • Higher mortality rate
<strong>Gastric Sleeve</strong>
Gastric SleeveProcedure
“An irreversible surgical procedure that forever changes the body’s anatomy removing a portion of the stomach to reduce its size and capacity.”

  • Mortality rate: 0.39%
  • Total complications: 22%
  • Major complications: 1.9%
The gastric sleeve procedure takes approximately 1 hour.
During sleeve gastrectomy, the surgeon will remove the larger, rounded part of the stomach from the body. (This is the only gastric surgery in which part of the stomach is taken out of the body.) The remaining stomach looks like a sleeve (or hose or tube) and holds about 15 percent as much food as the original stomach.
No, the gastric sleeve is permanent and not reversible.
2 nights in the hospital, 3 nights in a hotel.
After the surgery, patients usually incur intense pain, swelling, and discomfort which lasts a few weeks. Most patients can resume normal daily activities after one week.
Yes, as with any major surgery, there is a risk of blood clots, other complications or death:

  • Complications can occur with the stapling, such as leaks or bleeding
  • You may need malabsorptive surgery – intestinal bypass or duodenal switch – in addition to your sleeve gastrectomy in order to lose all the weight you need and want to lose
  • The smaller portion of the stomach may stretch, causing weight gain
  • Gastric surgery puts you at higher than normal risk. of developing gallstones and gallbladder disease
  • Standard risks associated with major surgery
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Separation of stapled areas (major revisional surgery)
  • Leaks from staple lines (major revisional surgery)
  • Nutritional deficiencies
Costs: $7,500.00-$20,000.00 (average cost: $12,600.00)
  • Promotes weight loss by restricting amount of food that can be eaten at any one time
  • Sleeve gastrectomy may be safer than gastric bypass for patients who have a number of health risks
  • It lowers the risk of ulcers compared to gastric bypass
  • Unlike gastric bypass, which changes stomach openings, sleeve gastrectomy leaves the openings intact — it does not involve any bypass of the intestinal tract and patients do not therefore suffer the complications of intestinal bypass such as intestinal obstruction, anemia, osteoporosis, vitamin deficiency and protein deficiency
  • Digestion system is not changed, and digestion goes on as normal
  • The surgery cuts away the part of the stomach that produces grehlin, a stomach hormone that stimulates hunger
  • Weight loss in the first 2 years is an average of 40-60% of excess weight
  • Done laparoscopically (keyhole surgery)
  • Doctor will remove 2/3-3/4 of your stomach during surgery
  • It is a permanent, non-reversible procedure
  • Cutting and stapling are used
  • Only restricts some solid food, and not liquid